How to acclimate indoor plants

How to acclimate indoor plants


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Many gardeners move their houseplants outside in the summer so that their houseplants can enjoy the sun and air found outdoors. But, because most houseplants are actually tropical plants, they must be brought back inside once the weather turns cold. With the start of the cooler autumn nights it is time to start the process of moving any outdoor plants inside. There are a few steps you need to take when acclimating plants from outdoors to indoors to prevent sending your plant into shock. One of the most common issues houseplants have when coming back indoors is bringing unwanted pests with them.

Content:
  • Acclimating outdoor plants to the indoors for winter
  • Growing Indoor Plants with Success
  • House Plants – Moving them Outdoors for the Summer
  • Best Winter Houseplants & How to Take Care of Indoor Plants in Winter
  • A Simple Way to Harden Off Seedlings in 7 Days (Or Less)
  • How to Bring Your Indoor Plants Back Inside
  • How to Move a Plant From Artificial Light to Sun Light
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How To Acclimate (Hardening Off) Indoor Plants To Sun

Acclimating outdoor plants to the indoors for winter

Plants that have been indoors even those bought early from a local greenhouse need to be acclimated to the fluctuating temperatures, wind and sunlight of life outdoors. In other words, you need to harden them off.

Hardening off new or overwintered plants helps transition them from their controlled indoor environment so they aren't shocked when moved into variable outdoor conditions. As plants spend more time outside, stems get stronger and their leaves develop a thicker cuticle the waxy covering on the surface of a leaf that prevents water loss. Cool-weather types, such as pansies and stock, tolerate temperatures in the degree F range so you can plant a month before your likely last frost.

Seedlings should have at least four to six sets of true leaves before going out. House plants, tropicals and warm-season vegetables, such as tomatoes , prefer days at 70 degrees F or warmer and nights in the 50s.

I usually plan a final plant date around May 10 in my zone 5 garden. See more of our helpful How To articles. Start plants in a protected spot out of direct sunlight and strong wind for an hour or two in midafternoon or whenever temps are closest to interior ones to avoid shock.

Examples include under a tree, next to a hedge or near the wall of the house or garage. Bring plants inside for the night. A cart like the one in the photo above makes this less labor intensive. Each day or two, increase the time spent outside by 30 to 45 minutes. If there are a few days of bad weather—driving rain or an unexpected cold snap—keep them inside. Once plants are used to being outdoors all day and mild overnight weather is in the forecast , pull them into a protected spot outdoors for the night, too.

Full-sun plants will need time to get used to direct sunlight. Start them out in part to full shade on the north side of your house or under a tree. Have you checked out our great Garden Plans?

A cold frame can save you the time and effort of walking back and forth to the house every day. Check out our great DIY cold frame ideas here. Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work in the garden. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality. Best Water Wands For Plants.

Best Weeding Sickles For Gardeners. What's the benefit of hardening off plants? See more of our helpful How To articles How to harden off plants Start plants in a protected spot out of direct sunlight and strong wind for an hour or two in midafternoon or whenever temps are closest to interior ones to avoid shock.

Try using a cold frame A cold frame can save you the time and effort of walking back and forth to the house every day. Published: March 19,Tags: cold protection garden basics how to plant protection seeds spring. Product Recommendations Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work in the garden. Root Slayer Shovel Shop now at Amazon.

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Growing Indoor Plants with Success

Many of us bring our houseplants outside for the summer, so they have the chance to soak up some rays, get some fresh air, and enjoy the season along with the rest of us. Living in Ontario means that the summer fun must eventually come to an end, though. With that said, this transition needs to be done gradually to acclimate your plants to their new environment. There are just a few basic steps that will make moving your plants back inside seamless and successful. When you are moving your plants back inside, you want to ensure that you set them up for success. One way to do this is to make sure that you are not bringing any unwanted hitchhikers inside with them!

In this article, I share how I acclimate plants. Botany Cross Stitch Kit – The Sill Large Indoor Plants, Indoor Plant Pots, Potted.

House Plants – Moving them Outdoors for the Summer

Plants that have been indoors even those bought early from a local greenhouse need to be acclimated to the fluctuating temperatures, wind and sunlight of life outdoors. In other words, you need to harden them off. Hardening off new or overwintered plants helps transition them from their controlled indoor environment so they aren't shocked when moved into variable outdoor conditions. As plants spend more time outside, stems get stronger and their leaves develop a thicker cuticle the waxy covering on the surface of a leaf that prevents water loss. Cool-weather types, such as pansies and stock, tolerate temperatures in the degree F range so you can plant a month before your likely last frost. Seedlings should have at least four to six sets of true leaves before going out. House plants, tropicals and warm-season vegetables, such as tomatoes , prefer days at 70 degrees F or warmer and nights in the 50s.

Best Winter Houseplants & How to Take Care of Indoor Plants in Winter

Earlier in the year, we wrote about how to give your houseplants a dreamy summer vacation by moving them outside for the summer. But as the warmer months wind down, you need to start thinking about bringing them back indoors for the winter. Like acclimating them to the outside in the spring, you must carefully acclimate your tropical houseplants back to living indoors for the winter. This will take some time, so get started sooner than later. When you think about it, it makes sense to take time moving your plants out in the spring.

To prevent plants from losing their leaves once inside, Oklahoma State University Extension recommends allowing them time to adjust to their new environment.

A Simple Way to Harden Off Seedlings in 7 Days (Or Less)

During the summer, you can improve the health and appearance of your houseplants by moving them outside. Most indoor plants thrive in outdoor conditions, but the transition can be tricky. When you take a plant from its indoor environment and place it in the outside elements all at once, the plant can easily become stressed as a result of shock. To successfully bring your indoor plants outdoors for summer, be sure to take these key factors into considerations:. Light is one of the biggest factors contributing to plant shock.

How to Bring Your Indoor Plants Back Inside

When frost threatens, it's time to move many of your outside plants indoors. Many tender bulbs, annuals, herbs, and tropical plants will only survive the winter inside. Here's advice on which plants to bring indoors this fall and how to winterize plants and pots. True annuals and plants that we grow as annuals considered tender perennials in southern regions cannot survive cold winter temperatures. But there's no need to say farewell to these plants forever! Many "annuals" can be brought inside, even tender plants that need a winter dormancy period.

You certainly can move an indoor plant outside as long as you keep these things in mind: 1. Make sure the climate outdoors is suitable for your houseplant.

How to Move a Plant From Artificial Light to Sun Light

Make sure your brand new plants are ready for the world! Learn how to harden off seedlings in 7 days or less with my proven method, or try one of these shortcuts to get your plants in the ground even faster. Hardening off your seedlings is the vital step of acclimating them to the outdoors to assure their survival. Up until this point, your seedlings have been protected from wind, rain, cold, heat, and intense sunlight.

RELATED VIDEO: Moving Houseplants Outdoors for Summer! - How To Move Indoor Plants Outdoors!

If your houseplants have spent the summer outdoors, now is the time to end their vacation and move them back inside. Bringing tender tropical and subtropical houseplants back indoors once outside nighttime temperatures dip below 50 degrees Fahrenheit protects them from chilling injury and death, and allows you to enjoy them throughout the fall and winter months. Maintaining healthy plants indoors requires that you provide them with ideal growing conditions. Prior to transitioning your houseplants, ensure that they will receive adequate light by cleaning nearby windows.

The days are getting shorter and the nights are getting cooler — both sure signs that fall is coming.

Much of the scenic beauty of nature has been replaced by densely populated areas that sprawl for miles from urban centers. This visual pollution affects us all and leaves us with a longing for a closer connection with nature. We spend about 90 percent of our time indoors. Interior plants are an ideal way to create attractive and restful settings while enhancing our sense of well being. In addition, houseplants can be a satisfying hobby and can help purify the air in our homes. Indoor plants not only convert carbon dioxide to oxygen, but they also trap and absorb many pollutants. To be a successful indoor gardener, you need to understand how the interior environment affects plant growth and how cultivation differs from growing plants outdoors.

This article explains the ins and outs of hardening-off plants so they are better able to handle the rigors of the outside environment. I lived in St. Paul, Minnesota for three years while I attended graduate school at the University of Minnesota.


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