Are fig plants good for indoor

Are fig plants good for indoor


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Become a better gardener! Discover our new Almanac Garden Planner features forFigs are a delicious treat that thrive in warm climates but can also be grown in more temperate regions with a bit of extra care. Figs thrive in areas with long and hot summers Zones 8 and warmer , though they can also be grown in colder zones if properly insulated from freezing temperatures or grown in containers and brought indoors. The common fig tree Ficus carica is the most popular species of fig for home gardeners because its flowers do not require pollination to yield figs.

Content:
  • How to Keep a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree Alive Without Losing Your Mind
  • Top 5 Indoor Plants and How to Care for Them
  • Tip of the Week: Caring for Weeping Figs
  • 8 Types of Indoor Ficus Plants | Best Ficus Trees for Home
  • Rubber Fig
  • Weeping Ficus
  • Our Complete Guide to Fiddle Leaf Fig Care
  • Why Your Fiddle leaf Fig Looks So Awful
  • Say hello to the Long leaf fig, the next on-trend indoor plant
  • How to care for the temperamental fiddle-leaf fig
WATCH RELATED VIDEO: How to keep Fiddle Leaf Fig Green and Healthy - Indoor plants

How to Keep a Fiddle Leaf Fig Tree Alive Without Losing Your Mind

Fiddle leaf fig. Here we share about its unusual habits in the wild, why we love it for the home, and a few care tips to help you keep yours thriving. What you may not know about your mild-mannered fiddle leaf fig is that in the wild, it can actually be a bit of a bully toward other plants in its native community. Fiddle leaf fig is one of a subgroup of species in the genus Ficus that have a peculiar way of getting ahead in life. Classified as a hemiepiphyte, fiddle leaf fig begins life in the wild as a seedling lodged in a crevice of a taller host plant.

As it grows, the young fig plant sends down long, sturdy roots straight into the ground. Fortunately, these species we now treasure as houseplants can also grow as less-aggressive, stand-alone plants too. As the name suggests, its leaf is roughly a broad oval with a slight constriction, giving it a distinct violin shape.

Fiddle leaf fig is an adaptable plant, and generally, its care is about the same as with many indoor foliage plants. Like most of its ficus cousins, fiddle leaf fig enjoys lots of bright, indirect light — even a bit of direct sun — like that from an east window.

When it comes to watering, fiddle leaf fig is a little different than other ficus species and prefers that the soil be allowed to dry out a bit between each watering. To avoid overwatering your fiddle leaf fig, check the level of moisture in the soil using a wooden chopstick, and wait to water until the top half of soil is dry.

This will mean more frequent watering during the summer months and a lot less watering during the winter months. Good drainage is key, so try to choose a container with a drain hole. If your plant is too large to water in the sink, you can also use a large turkey baster to remove excess water from the pot saucer — or just be careful with the amount of water you use during each watering.

As a native to lowland tropical rainforests of South Africa, fiddle leaf fig ideally would like conditions a bit warmer with more humidity than we normally find in our homes. So anything to protect it from cold drafts and bump up the humidity will make the plant that much happier.

A pebble tray filled with water or a room humidifier can be helpful during the winter. But the best thing you can do for your fiddle leaf is to set it outside during the summers in a brightly shaded spot — maybe with a little morning sun — and let it soak up all that heat and humidity until nighttime temperatures begin dropping below fifty degrees again in the fall.

Just give us a call or stop in to talk with our team. In the Wild What you may not know about your mild-mannered fiddle leaf fig is that in the wild, it can actually be a bit of a bully toward other plants in its native community.

Light Fiddle leaf fig is an adaptable plant, and generally, its care is about the same as with many indoor foliage plants. Facebook Twitter Pinterest.


Top 5 Indoor Plants and How to Care for Them

Not to be confused with a fig leaf tree, the fiddle-leaf fig is one of the most popular plants when it comes to interior design. From the stylish appearance to the ease of maintenance, these plants are an excellent choice for almost any household. They can regrow from a trimmed trunk. Many people believe that you have to have all sorts of gardening supplies and special attention to detail to maintain these plants.

You might like it tepid, but the fiddle leaf fig is a native jungle dweller, which means this tree likes it hot. That said, fiddle leaf figs will generally do.

Tip of the Week: Caring for Weeping Figs

This majestic specimen is one of our favorites. They are lush and sculptural and they make for excellent eye candy in photographs of some of the most beautiful interiors you see floating around the Internet. Growing Conditions: Bright to moderate indirect light or fluorescent light; degrees. Keep soil lightly moist at all times, but avoid over watering. Size: A tropical fig is actually capable of growing up to 40 feet tall in its jungle home. Indoors, plants grow very slowly and can be kept for a long time before outgrowing the space. It will grow less than 6 feet tall over the period of many years. If ever there was the perfect plant for the ultimate black thumb, the ZZ plant is it. This virtually indestructible houseplant can take months and months of neglect and low light and still look amazing.

8 Types of Indoor Ficus Plants | Best Ficus Trees for Home

Quite possibly the most reliable exotic fruit that can be grown in containers is the fig. They are fast growing, attractive, and can bear fruit at a young age. Modern figs do not require a pollinator nor do they have to be grafted, unlike citrus and many other tropical fruits. Figs just love to grow. And the fruits sure taste delicious fresh off the tree.

With huge, wavy green leaves that grow to more than a foot long, fiddle-leaf figs instantly give any room a jungle-like vibe. Lush and sculptural, this tropical plant is actually a tree capable of growing up to 50 feet tall in its jungle home.

Rubber Fig

Ficus Benjamina or as it's more commonly known, the Weeping Fig , is a common indoor houseplant which comes in multiple different looks and styles. It can be grown as a tall indoor tree with leafless braided trunks, or a tall bushy indoor plant, or even as a short pot plant. The leaves on the all green variety are unremarkable and because the Weeping Fig is not a flowering houseplant, its main attraction is the overall shape and elegant appearance that it creates. This growth pattern means with reasonable care, you can have a tree-like indoor plant which is both grand and impressive but at the same time graceful and tranquil. You might also come across this houseplant also being grown happily as a Bonsai Tree.

Weeping Ficus

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Fiddle-leaf fig Ficus lyrata is a stylish and desirable indoor plant. This ornamental fig grows well in a large container positioned in a brightly-lit spot in your home. Also keep the plant away from air-conditioners and heaters, which can also damage foliage. These are ultimately big trees growing 2 to 3 metres indoors and more than 9 metres high and wide in its native rainforest habitat. Regularly transplant indoor plants into a larger container as the tree grows. Indicators that the plant needs to be moved into a bigger pot include that it becomes unstable and can easily tip over and that it dries out quickly.

You might like it tepid, but the fiddle leaf fig is a native jungle dweller, which means this tree likes it hot. That said, fiddle leaf figs will generally do.

Our Complete Guide to Fiddle Leaf Fig Care

Australian House and Garden. The ficus family are firm favourites when it comes to their suitability as indoor plants. We know all too well about the enduring craze for Fiddle leaf figs but have you heard of its distant cousin the long leafed or sabre tooth fig Ficus longifolia? Due to its new-found glory, it's not currently available everywhere but, according to Richard, "this is one truly reliable indoor plant that will soon be on everyone's radar as they look for alternatives to the usual.

Why Your Fiddle leaf Fig Looks So Awful

A lot of houseplant newbies and even more experienced indoor gardeners might feel nervous about the idea of caring for fig trees. They are trees, after all, and trees usually get big. Ficus trees also need lots of sunlight and have pretty precise requirements for water and nutrients. A single, good-sized tree can beautifully fill a whole corner or be the centerpiece for an entire room, while it would easily take several smaller plants to create the same impact. You can buy a young tree and keep it pruned to control its size if you have a smaller space, or you can let it grow large over time. Ficus trees can easily reach 10 feet indoors or even larger if you have high ceilings and lots of light.

Creeping fig is a delightful little houseplant.

Say hello to the Long leaf fig, the next on-trend indoor plant

Fiddle-leaf figs are possibly the most trendy and beautiful plants for interiors, but they are also the most particular about their environment and need daily attention. Despite their neediness, we love them anyway. We used a fiddle-leaf fig in our latest Orchard Hollow project. We added it to the dining room which really created warmth within the space. Clean leaves with small, wet towelette to keep them fresh. Snake plants bring a fun and unique texture to your home. If you struggle with that dreaded brown thumb, this plant is the right plant for you.

How to care for the temperamental fiddle-leaf fig

Despite their popularity, greenhouse owner Han Nguyen says fiddle-leaf figs "are not the easiest plants to look after". Ficus lyrata can be temperamental. They're known to throw a tantrum at any change in environment and can take awhile to adjust to your home. So if you've picked up what you thought was a cute and easy plant, or been gifted one by a well-meaning friend, here's how to keep your fiddle-leaf fig alive and thriving.